Friday, April 16, 2010

The Big Issue

Bought a copy of The Big Issue outside Sainsbury's in Clapham High Street and found that it contained an article by David Harvey (in fact an extract from his new book The Enigma of Capital) which says some things we have long said:
Can capitalism survive the present trauma? Yes, of course. But at what cost? This question masks another. Can the capitalist class reproduce its power in the face of the raft of economic, social, political and geopolitical and environmental difficulties? Again, the answer is a resounding 'Yes it can'.
This will, however, require the mass of the people to give generously of the fruits of their labour to those in power, to surrender many of their rights and their hard-won asset values (in everything from housing to pension rights) and to suffer environmental degradations galore, to say nothing of serial reductions in their living standards which will mean starvation for many of those already struggling to survive at rock bottom.
and
Capitalism will never fall on its own. It will have to be pushed. The accumulation of capital will never cease. It will have to be stopped. The capitalist class will never willingly surrender its power. It will have to be dispossessed.
That's why we're contesting this election -- to urge people to organise politically to dispossess the capitalist class and establish a world society of common ownership, democratic control and production solely not profit.

It's not too late to buy this week's Big Issue. But, remember, the real big issue is whether capitalism should be allowed to continue or whether it should be replaced by socialism (not which political non-entity would make the best managing director of UKCapitalism plc).

2 comments:

stuart said...

I recently finished David Harvey's new book, and would recommend it highly to this blog's readers. It is an analysis of the present economic and ecological crisis, and helps us understand what is happening and why, and what might be done about it.

Readers should be cautious about some of Harvey's advice about "what is to be done", as it is influenced by Leninism (a discredited anti-democratic ideology), and he has a habit of using contentious ideological terms without explanation or caution. But his faults can and should be overlooked for the sake of his general argument.

stuart said...

I recently finished David Harvey's new book, and would recommend it highly to this blog's readers. It is an analysis of the present economic and ecological crisis, and helps us understand what is happening and why, and what might be done about it.

Readers should be cautious about some of Harvey's advice about "what is to be done", as it is influenced by Leninism (a discredited anti-democratic ideology), and he has a habit of using contentious ideological terms without explanation or caution. But his faults can and should be overlooked for the sake of his general argument.